Join Us and Royal Canin: National Take Your Cat to the Vet Day

August 22 has been set aside as a date to remind cat owners everywhere to take their #cats to the Vet. CFA has joined with Royal Canin with this promotion.

According to a release from Royal Canin, did you know that while 92 percent of cat owners agree that their cat’s health is important to them, only 41 percent take their cat to the vet for regular checkups, according to a new survey from Royal Canin, a pet nutrition company? In fact, only one cat is seen by a veterinarian for every five dogs, despite the fact that 10 million more cats are owned in the United States.

“Our goal with this year’s program is to rally cat owners, veterinarians, industry partners and even celebrities together to shine the spotlight on the importance of veterinary care for cats,” explained Kamie Eckert, president of Royal Canin USA. “While the gap in preventive veterinary care between dogs and cats in the U.S. continues to be a concern, the great news is that it can be addressed.”

For more information and tips on stress-free vet visits for cat owners and cats or to learn more about Royal Canin visit www.royalcanin.com/Cat2VetDay. You can also join the conversation on social media by using hashtag #Cat2VetDay.

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Those “Kinky” Cats!

Editor’s note:  With all the emphasis being placed on felines with curly coats, we thought we’d share this article:

Those Kinky Cats
by Tracy Petty

Mutations can cause all sorts of changes in cats, just like in other animals. When someone with some knowledge of genetics spots a mutation that they think is interesting, they might develop it, test that it is not harmful, and eventually, that mutation may become the basis for a new breed.

That’s what happened to create six varieties of “kinky cats.” Each of these breeds were developed from separate gene mutations which affected the coat of the offspring. None of these breeds have any known relation to one another; they are all separate mutations occurring at different times and places, but each was carefully bred to make these wonderful and interesting breeds.

Cornish Rex

First found in 1950 in Cornwall, England, the Cornish Rex coat is short, soft, and wavy. While most cats have three layers to their coat, Cornish Rex have only the very shortest “down” layer. For most cats, this layer is hidden amongst the longer layers of hair as an insulating layer. Without guard hairs, the Cornish Rex coat is extremely soft and warm to the touch. The curly coat should lay down in waves, resembling the old-time Marcel wave hairstyles. Cornish Rex are very athletic cats, with long legs and sleek, muscular bodies. They are very active and extremely friendly, and can jump quite high — especially for toys!

Devon Rexdevon rex

Also discovered in England less than a decade later, the Devon Rex mutation was originally thought to be the same as the Cornish Rex, but test breedings quickly proved that this was a different mutation entirely. The Devon Rex coat is also soft and curly, but includes the “awn”, or second layer of coat. The awn hair is only slightly longer than the down hair, but often does not lay in waves close to thebody. Rather, it can form loose Marcel waves or be more free-form waves all over the cat. The head of the Devon Rex has a pixie-like appearance with high cheek bones and very large, wide-set ears. They are extremely loving, people-oriented cats and like the Cornish Rex, their short coats mean minimal shedding and very little coat maintenance.

American Wirehairwirehair

First discovered in the mid-1960s, the American Wirehair is very unique and distinct from any of the Rex breeds. Unlike the Cornish and Devon Rex, the American Wirehair’s curl is in the guard hairs, the longest, outer layer of coat. This is the layer that is meant to protect cats from the elements more than insulate, so it has a harder feel, and thus a completely different texture to the curl. As the name Wirehair implies, this is a coarser, tightly curled coat and it does not lay down in waves, but forms a plush layer of hair around the entire cat. Following a body style similar to the American Shorthair, they don’t have the other-worldly look of the Cornish and Devon Rex, and have a quieter, more reserved demeanor, while still being very affectionate and playful.

Selkirk RexSelkirk Rex

Another American mutation first found in 1987 in Montana is the Selkirk Rex. Like the American Wirehair, the Selkirk curl is in the outer guard hairs, but the coat is soft rather than wired. The curls tend to be large and loosely organized, sometimes gathering in “ringlets” in both the long haired and short haired variety of Selkirk. Several heavy-boned breeds were used to develop the Selkirk Rex breed, so this is a broad, substantial cat with a round head and large, expressive eyes. It is a gentle, patient, and loving breed which requires minimal grooming, as excessive brushing or bathing may relax the curl.

LaPermLaPerm

While a completely separate mutation from other other curly breeds, the LaPerm has taken bits and pieces from the others and formed a unique look and feel. The first LaPerms were found in Oregon in the early ’80s, but were not developed into a breed for nearly a decade after that. Like the Selkirk Rex, LaPerms can be either long haired or short haired, and have a coat texture that is not as soft as the Rex breeds but not as coarse as a Wirehair. It has a more rippled texture, sometimes laying in waves, or ringlets, or even corkscrew curls. They have a moderate body style and medium boning, and unlike the other curly breeds, the LaPerm has long flexible whiskers that don’t break off. These are gentle, affectionate cats that are quick to purr and are always ready to be the perfect lap cat whenever a lap should appear.

Sphynxsphinx

While not technically a kinky-coated cat, the Sphynx is certainly the most risqué breed, daring to go bare! The Sphynx mutation causes hairlessness, or near hairlessness, as most will have a bit of very short hair on the face, ears, feet or tail, and may have a very short, fine “peach fuzz” over the body. Their skin is wrinkled, especially on the legs, head and neck area, and while the body may appear smooth, they can suddenly move and send wrinkles cascading down the body. Sphynx have a full midsection as if they’ve perpetually just finished a good meal, and they love to be the center of attention and will do what they have to do to get and hold your attention. Although they require a bit of upkeep and cleaning to remove body oils that would usually be absorbed by a coat, shedding and dander are minimal and so Sphynx are sometimes tolerated by people who are otherwise sensitive to cats.

What are you doing at 3 p.m. 5/29?

Monday is Memorial Day, a day set aside to remember and honor all those brave men and women who have sacrificed so much for our country.

Did you know:

• More than 260,000 graves at Arlington National Cemetery are adorned with American flags each Memorial Day.

• More than 42 million veterans have served the country in war time.

• Over 1.3 million members of the armed services have lost their lives in conflict.

Most of us will be celebrating the holiday by holding a backyard barbecue. In fact, statistics show that 75% of will be grilling that day. More than 1.5 million will be watching the National Memorial Day parade on TV.

But did you also know that according to a Gallup Poll, only 28% of Americans surveyed knew why Memorial Day is observed?

Some responded by saying it’s the official start of summer; others said it was the day beaches opened. Approximately 19% had no response at all.

So, here’s another fact I would like to share: In December 2000, the US Congress passed and President Clinton signed into law “The National Moment of Remembrance Act,” P.L. 106-579, creating the White House Commission on the National Moment of Remembrance. As an act of Unity, the National Moment of Remembrance encourages all Americans to pause wherever they are at 3 p.m. local time on Memorial Day for a minute of silence to remember and honor those who have died in service to the nation.

So, as you head out to the beach or fire up the grill, at 3 p.m. will you take a moment to pause, remember and share?

memorial day

New York to Outlaw Declawing?

As we celebrate National Pet Month, I came across this article about NY State and the declawing of Cats

The article from the Associated Press in Albany, says a bill has been introduced to outlaw the declawing of cats in New York. If passed, NY would be the first state in the nation to outlaw the declawing of cats.

Interesting to note that declawing is banned in the United Kingdom and several other European Countries and in several California cities, including San Francisco and Los Angeles.

CFA issued a revised guidance statement in June 2003 pertaining to declawing.

We will keep you updated, but let us know what you think of the proposed legislation in New York.

Celebrating Pets Isn’t Limited to the Month of May

This month marks the start of National Pet Month. But as cat owner, we celebrate our pets all year long. For many of us, the road to our heart is paved with paw prints.

CFA recently posed the question on Facebook: How old were you when you got your first cat?

Alice shared that her parents presented her with her first cat before the age of 2. She’s had many more since then, telling us each one was cherished throughout the years.

Shannon posted that when her mom brought her home from the hospital, her father brought home a litter of kittens he found while on patrol.

Annie related that she asked for her first kitten when she was just a three-year-old. She recalls that she asked for a kitten after watching Pinocchio. She adopted a gold eyed white DSH with a grey patched head…and of course named him Figaro. Annie says he was her best friend.

Betsy tells us that she has a picture of herself at five years holding a kitten. She says at the young age of 79 she continues to care for cats.

Lana’s short-hair, pure white Snowball girl lived to be 18.

So as we celebrate National Pet Month, it is certainly clear that sometimes the smallest things take up the most room in our hearts.Friendship week3

Celebrate!

It’s that time of year again…time to celebrate, time to reflect, time to look forward.

There’s less than one week officially left in the CFA show season, and then we begin anew on May 6. We will soon be announcing the top cats for 2016-17. Congratulations to all who participated this season!

The awards will officially be presented at the CFA Annual Meeting and Awards Banquet in Chicago. Dates for the event are June 29 – July 2 at the Fairmont Chicago Millennium Park. It’s the Midwest Region’s turn to host the annual event.

There’s lots of cool things planned. Everything you need to know is online. Don’t wait to make your reservations!

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In addition to celebrating, it is also a time to say thank you!

Thank you for registering/recording your cat with CFA. By registering/recording and participating in CFA events, you help support our mission to enhance the well-being of ALL cats worldwide…through education, responsible cat ownership, and proper care.

Also, thank you for your numerous hours of volunteer services, whether it be through your local cat club or by serving on a CFA committee or the Board. Your time and enthusiasm are greatly appreciated.

And, thank you for sharing your vision via mentorship. You have helped so many newcomers move forward and discover a life-time passion.

Thanks to you, CFA continues to grow as the premier cat association.

See you at the next show!