Meet the Cornish Rex

Cornish RexIn appearance, Cornish Rex cats are a study in curves starting most noticeably with their coat which ideally falls in washboard waves. The coat is very short, lies close to the body and is incredibly soft to the touch, prompting comparisons to cut velvet, karakul lamb, rabbit fur or silk. In fact, it feels like a Cornish Rex coat and nothing else is the same.

Their bodies resemble Greyhounds, with a naturally arched back, large thigh muscles which gives them the opportunity to launch themselves at a moments notice. Their heads are smallish and egg shaped. They possess huge, luminous eyes. No cat has ears like the Cornish Rex and the bigger the better, as long as they are set high on the head.

Cornish RexIn personality, the Cornish Rex is extremely affectionate and people-oriented. They are also active cats whose kitten-like antics last for their lifetime and who can be very inventive in their play. Favorite Cornish Rex games are fetch, catch and even “discus”, in which the cat uses its hand-like paw to pick up and toss a small object. In spite of their sophisticated, elegant appearance, Cornish Rex cats are anything but cool, aloof or dignified. They are perfect pets for the owner who wants active cats to participate in family life.

Learn more about the Cornish Rex…

 

CFA Hosts World Cat Congress Show

Cats will rule in Vegas, April 22-23!

wcc_logo_globeOver 200 pedigreed cats and kittens to see, as well as everyday household pet cats. You can sit and watch cats on the judging table, or walk around and visit with the cats between judgings.

There will be six judging rings going on concurrently throughout the day, each day. No matter what time you arrive you’re bound to see your favorite breed being judged.

There will be booths with cat toys, cat supplies and unique cat-related apparel and gift items for sale.

Tickets will be available at the door.
Admission:
Adults $5
Children 4 – 17 $2
Children under 4 FREE when accompanied by a paid adult admission.
Click here for $1 off coupon

More details can be found here…

The Dangers of Easter Lilies

Although beautiful, Easter lilies are a real health threat to your cat. Just one bite of a petal, leaves, the stem, or even the pollen of an Easter lily can cause problems with the digestive system, and can even lead to kidney failure and death.

Early signs (approximately 2-4 hours after ingestion) of lily poisoning
in your cat include:

Vomiting
Lethargy
Lack of appetite

Later signs (approximately 24-72 hours after ingestion) include:

Initially, increased thirst and urination. Then, decreased urination if the kidneys fail.

You may not actually see you kitty ingest the lily, but if you see suspicious symptoms and there are lilies around, seek out a veterinarian.  When it comes to treatment, time is of the essence! If treatment is administered within the first few hours, chances are good that your kitty will survive. After 18-24 hours, however, the prognosis is not as hopeful, even for cats who receive treatment.

The best way to keep your cat safe is to make sure your cat doesn’t have Easter lily access to begin with. Instead, choose one of the other beautiful Easter flowers that are safer for your cat, for instance: Easter orchids, violets, or Easter Cactus.
Easter Lily Danger

Meet the Colorpoint Shorthair

CPSH-1The Colorpoint Shorthair is a medium sized, svelte, refined cat with long tapering lines, very lithe, but muscular. The ideal is a cat with type identical to the Siamese, but with its own distinct and unique colors. While the color differences set it apart as a unique breed, the purpose of the hybridization was to establish cats identical in type to the Siamese but with separate colors.

CPSH-2Like the Siamese, they should have long, smooth heads resembling a fine wedge and large, wide placed ears that flow into the top of the wedge created by the head. From the side, the profile should be straight from the tip of the nose to the forehead. The graceful body starts with a long, slender neck connected to a tubular, muscled body. Not skinny, the body should be the same width and depth from the shoulders to the hips when viewed from any angle. Completing this elegant body is a long whippy tail which, when viewed overall, is the single element with the most point color on the body of the Colorpoint Shorthair.

Extremely inquisitive, this breed will get into almost anything at least once at any level, a testament to their athleticism and highly developed intelligence.

A joy to watch and an even greater joy to have in one’s life, the graceful and playful Colorpoint Shorthair is an endearing variation of the renowned Siamese.

Learn more about the Colorpoint Shorthair…

 

Use a Harness on Your Cat for Safety, Exercise and Fun!

This is the time of year when your cat may be interested in going outside. Believe it or not, your cat can adapt to using a harness and leash. It just takes some time, patience and practice. You can teach your cat how to use a harness or leash and take your cat for a walk!

Cat trainer and breeder, Lisa Maria Padilla demonstrates how to harness your cat with a Sturdi Harness.

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Photo: Larry Johnson

Be sure to discuss with your vet ahead of time your intention and ask how to properly protect your cat from fleas and ticks.

Below are some tips for you to consider in using a harness and leash:

1. Purchase a harness like the Sturdi harness that is made specially for cats.

2. Leave the harness laying around so that your cat gets used to it and let your cat sniff the harness and get used to it.

3. Use treats to encourage your cat the entire time you are trying the harness on your cat. If your cat objects, don’t get discouraged, just take the harness off and try again another day. Be sure you have two fingers between the harness and your cat’s body.

4. If your cat is agreeable to the harness, let him sit with the harness on wait a bit before you use the leash. Observe your cat to see how relaxed he is and that should give you a guide as to how to proceed.

5. When you attach the leash, follow the same procedure and monitor your cat’s comfort level. You can let the leash drag on the floor until you see that your cat is comfortable. Practice using the harness and leash indoors until you and your cat are comfortable. Keep the leash loose to give your cat room to move, speak in a soothing voice and give him treats to let him know he is doing a good job.

6. Apply gentle but firm pressure. Be sure not to jerk or drag the leash.

7. Once you decide to venture outdoors, take your cat to a quiet spot and sit with him while your cat roams around with you holding the leash.

8. Repeat this process until you and your cat are comfortable. Allow him to explore his surroundings with you following behind with the leash. You will get an idea as to when a good time is to venture further with your cat.

For some inspiration, check out the adventures of “Fish and Chips”, 2 kitties who LOVE going on outdoor trips with their humans!

Nursing Home Companion

In one of the sweetest stories of the week, we learn about Oreo.

Oreo was a black & white stray kitty, living near St. Augustine Health Ministries in Cleveland, OH.

She kept returning to the nursing home, and pretty soon had worked her way into being part of the “staff”.  :-)  Now she spends her days bringing joy to residents and staff.

Read more….

Meet the Chartreux

Chatreux-1Old as antiquity, the robust and muscular French Chartreux (pronounced: shar trew) is built for survival. Its physical appearance still reflects its ancient origin in the harsh arid cold of mountainous Asia Minor. Its large body mass conserves heat, aided by a dense woolly coat that repels dew and seasonal weather. Small, fur-covered appendages-ears, legs, and tail-prevent heat loss and resist frostbite.

 

The Chartreux is a study in contrasts. Often described as a “potato on toothpicks,” the Chartreux has a robust body, broad shoulders and a deep chest, all complemented by medium short, finely boned legs. The Chartreux is also known for its smile. The rounded head with its softly contoured forehead tapers to a narrowed muzzle. This gives the Chartreux an image of smiling.

Chartreux-2

 

Chartreux are highly communicative. Very active tails, ear movements, ever-changing facial expressions, and a vast repertoire of trills, chirps, and coos speak volumes to the observant owner.

 

Chartreux are named according to the French convention of using the letter of the alphabet assigned to a given year. For example, kittens born during calendar year 2005 have names beginning with the letter A; 2006, B; 2007, C; and so on. The letters K, Q, W, X, Y, Z are not used, so letters repeat every 20 years. As a result, fanciers can tell the age of a Chartreux simply by knowing its name.

 

Learn more about the Chartreux…

 

Family Pets Aid Child Development

Kids-And-PetsIn a newly published study, the University of Liverpool examined the benefits to children growing up with pets.

The study concluded that youngsters with pets tend to have greater self-esteem, less loneliness, and enhanced social skills –  research that adds strength to claims that household pets can help support healthy child development.

“The patterns among sub-populations and age groups suggests that companion animals have the potential to promote healthy child and adolescent development,” says WALTHAM researcher Nancy Gee, a co-author of the study. “This is an exciting field of study and there is still much to learn about the processes through which pet ownership may impact healthy child development.”

I don’t think the conclusion of this study is any surprise to those of us who have grown up with pets…  :-)

New Film Opens: Kedi

KediJust opening recently is the new film Kedi – the Turkish word for “cat”.

The filmmaker takes us to Istanbul, and provides us a cats-eye view of the city.

“Hundreds of thousands of cats have roamed the metropolis of Istanbul freely for thousands of years, wandering in and out of people’s lives, impacting them in ways only an animal who lives between the worlds of the wild and the tamed can. Cats and their kittens bring joy and purpose to those they choose, giving people an opportunity to reflect on life and their place in it. In Istanbul, cats are the mirrors to ourselves.”

Find a local screening here:  https://www.kedifilm.com/

Meet the Burmilla

Burmilla-1While the Burmilla is the newest breed to grace the cat fancy as a CFA breed, the origin to this breed dates back over 30 years ago, as a cross between a Burmese and a Chinchilla Silver Persian.

The Burmilla is medium sized cat with a muscular yet elegant body. The head is sculptured in appearance, where the rounded top head, nose profile, medium broad muzzle and well-developed chin set the balance. The eyes can be any shade of green and are often greenish gold to yellowish in youth, with the green coming in as they mature.

Burmilla-2 Their distinguishing feature is their sparkling silver coat, and distinctive “make up” lining the nose, lips and eyes. The Burmilla comes in two coat lengths, semi longhair and shorthair.

The Burmilla is an irreverent and independent cat that adores its owner and displays many kitten-like characteristics even into adulthood. Fun loving, yet quiet and gentle, this sweet natured cat gets along well with children and other animals.

Learn more about the Burmilla…