Meet the Burmilla

Burmilla-1While the Burmilla is the newest breed to grace the cat fancy as a CFA breed, the origin to this breed dates back over 30 years ago, as a cross between a Burmese and a Chinchilla Silver Persian.

The Burmilla is medium sized cat with a muscular yet elegant body. The head is sculptured in appearance, where the rounded top head, nose profile, medium broad muzzle and well-developed chin set the balance. The eyes can be any shade of green and are often greenish gold to yellowish in youth, with the green coming in as they mature.

Burmilla-2 Their distinguishing feature is their sparkling silver coat, and distinctive “make up” lining the nose, lips and eyes. The Burmilla comes in two coat lengths, semi longhair and shorthair.

The Burmilla is an irreverent and independent cat that adores its owner and displays many kitten-like characteristics even into adulthood. Fun loving, yet quiet and gentle, this sweet natured cat gets along well with children and other animals.

Learn more about the Burmilla…

Meet the Burmese

BurmeseThe overall impression of the ideal Burmese would be a cat of medium size with substantial bone structure, good muscular development and a surprising weight for its size.

The facial expression of a Burmese is sweet, innocent and unique among pedigreed cats. It has been said that when the Burmese looks at you, it feels like it is “looking into your soul.”

BurmeseThis little bundle is clothed in a shiny, close-lying coat that feels like satin. The Burmese coat come in four colors: sable, champagne, blue and platinum. Sable is the most common of the four, and is a deep chocolate brown color.

These are the ultimate companion cats. They love being with people, playing with them, and keeping them entertained. They crave close physical contact and are referred to by some breeders as “Velcro cats.” They abhor an empty lap, will follow their humans from room to room, and sleep in bed with them, preferably under the covers, cuddled as close as possible.

Learn more about the Burmese…

The Twelve Days of Catmas, part 1

If you aren’t following us on our Facebook Page, we’ve been sharing the 12 Days of Catmas!  (Yes, traditionally the 12 Days of Christmas happen AFTER December 25, but these are cats, and they don’t follow the rules….  :-)

Here’s our first 6 days:

On the sixth day of Catmas, my true love gave to me:
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Six Maine Coon Cats


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Five Russian Blues


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Four Siamese


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Three Devon Rexes


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Two Orientals


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and a sweet little Somali girl

Meet the British Shorthair

British ShorthairThe British Shorthair, probably the oldest English breed of cat, traces its ancestry back to the domestic cat of Rome. Although first known as the British Blue, due to the breed’s original color, its native country incorporated a wide variety of colors under the term British Shorthair in the 1950’s. CFA also recognizes the British Shorthair in many different colors and patterns.

The British Shorthair is a medium to large cat of compact build, powerful and well balanced. Taking years to mature, British Shorthairs often do not reach full size and development until the age of three.

British ShorthairThe British Shorthair coat is like no other; short and as dense as deep pile carpet. Their coats are another factor that serves them well in English gardens during the winter. No other breed of cat has as dense a coat with more hairs per square inch, than the British Shorthair. Running your fingers through the coat is so pleasurable that breeders often extend this courtesy, when politely asked. Though luxurious to pet, the short coat needs minimal care.

Living with British Shorthairs is relaxing. They are not overly active cats, which is why they are comfortable in apartments as well as houses. With true British reserve, they will wait for an invitation to join you at your side on a couch or chair.

Learn more about the British Shorthair…

Meet the Bombay

BombayThe Bombay originated in the mid-1960s as a hybrid between the Burmese and the American Shorthair.

With its jet black, gleaming coat, gold to copper eyes, solid body and sweet facial expression, the ideal Bombay has an unmistakable look of its own. The Bombay is a medium-size cat, well-balanced, friendly, alert, and outgoing; muscular and having a surprising weight for its size.

BombayBombays are wonderful companions and will sit on your lap hour after hour; they love to be around people. They will follow you wherever you go changing rooms whenever you move. They want to be the center of attention and in the middle of everything.  They are highly intelligent cats that love to play and are easy to train.

The Bombay is one of the easiest breeds to groom and bathe. Since their coats are so short and satiny there is very little shedding. If given a monthly bath, their shedding is almost nonexistent.

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Meet the Birman

BirmanThe ideal Birman is a large, long stocky cat. It has long, silky hair, not as thick as the Persian, and does not mat.

The color of the coat is light, preferably with a golden cast, as if misted with gold. The “points” are darker, similar to the Siamese and colorpointed Persian. The very distinctive white feet are ideally symmetrical.

BirmanThe unique white color of the feet and up the back of the hind legs are probably what draw the most attention from spectators at cat shows. They are referred to as “gloves” and “laces.”  The “gloves” on the front feet, if perfect, go across in an even line, and the “laces” on the hind feet end in a point up the back of the leg.

Birmans are often referred to as “middle of the road” cats. Of course, there are variations among the breed, but they do not tend to be as active as shorthaired breeds such as Abyssinians, nor as laid back as some of the other longhaired cats such as Persians.

Birmans have semi-long, silky hair that is not inclined to mat because of its texture. Consequently, frequent grooming is not necessary. However, it is a good idea to comb out the coat a few minutes a day as part of the attention your cat receives on a regular basis.

Learn more about the Birman…

Meet the Balinese

sept28-2The first look at the Balinese brings to mind a Siamese cat except for the length of its coat. Under that long, silky ermine coat he wears so proudly, this beautiful cat is all Siamese, and that includes his personality. The Balinese has a long, fine, silky coat, covering its long, hard tubular body.

Balinese cats come in the four colors: seal point (dark brown), chocolate point (a warmer, milk-chocolate brown), blue point (slate grey), and lilac point (rosy grey). These colors are restricted to the points of the cat, which are the tail, the feet, the mask (entire face) and the ears.

Very little is known about when or how sept28-1the first Balinese appeared, although it is generally accepted that the breed originated as a spontaneous mutation of the Siamese cat. Siamese kittens with longer hair began appearing in Siamese litters in the early 1900’s. Because their longer coats were not acceptable for cat shows or desirable for breeding show cats, breeders would place them in pet homes . It was not until the 1940’s that serious efforts were made to promote them as a recognized breed.

Balinese cats are active, intelligent, social and vocal. They want to be an everyday part of the lives of their human family. This includes “helping” you with your everyday chores, sleeping under the covers at night, and enjoying energetic play.

Because the long, fine silky coat of the Balinese does not have an undercoat, they shed very little hair. This also means that the coat will not mat and consequently little grooming is required for the pet Balinese except for occasional brushing and a bath when it appears to be necessary.

Learn more about the Balinese …

Meet the American Wirehair

 

The American Wirehair breed is a newcomer to the sport of pedigreed cat exhibiting, in the sense that it has only been in existence since 1964. This breed has the distinction of being among the first American spontaneous mutations recognized for registration and championship exhibition in the Cat Fanciers’ Association.

sept7-1The first American Wirehairs were born in a barn on the Council Rock Farm, Upstate New York, where four wire-coated kittens appeared in a litter as a spontaneous, natural mutation. The litter’s parents were named Fluffy and Bootsie and were ordinary barn cats.

The coat, which is not only springy, dense, and resilient, but also coarse and hard to the touch, distinguishes the American Wirehair from all other breeds. Individual hairs are crimped, hooked, or bent, including hair within the ears.

sept7-2Wirehair temperament can be described as warm happiness. There has never been a Wirehair that does not like to rub its head or leg against its significant human. American Wirehairs are easy to care for and resistant to disease. Pet owners delight with their quiet, reserved and loving ways. Even when they are busy they make the time to pay great attention to all family members. However, everyone must pet them, hug them and tell them how wonderful they are.

Learn more about the American Wirehair …

Meet the American Shorthair

Aug-ASH1Originally known as the Domestic Shorthair, this breed was renamed “American Shorthair” in 1966 to better represent its “All American” character and to differentiate it from any other shorthaired breed. The name “American Shorthair” also reinforces the idea that our native North American shorthaired cat is distinctly different from what may be found in streets, neighborhoods and barnyards.

American Shorthairs are low-maintenance cats. These beautiful cats are not only lovely to look at, but healthy, easy-going and affectionate. Males are significantly larger than females, weighing eleven to fifteen pounds when fully grown. Mature females weigh eight to twelve pounds when they achieve full growth at three to four years of age.

Aug-ASH2Known as a cat of many colors, the American Shorthair has more than eighty different colors and patterns. Ranging from handsome brown tabby to glistening blue-eyed white, shimmering shaded cameo to flashy calico, striking tabby and white to subtle dilute, and many colors in between, the American has made its mark in the cat fancy. The most widely recognized American Shorthair color and pattern is the silver classic tabby with dense black markings on a sparkling silver background. Consistently in the top ten most popular breeds of cat, the American Shorthair has truly come into its own.

Although the breed is very affectionate, they do not require constant attention. They are very adept at entertaining themselves. An American frequently finds imaginary friends with whom to play.

Learn more about the American Shorthair…