October 21: Cures4Cats

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Join the Cat Fanciers’ Association and the Winn Feline Foundation as we celebrate Cures4Cats Day.

Cats provide their people with companionship and love, and as 92% of surveyed cat owners agree, feline health plays a significant role in their overall well-being. Winn Feline Foundation has established October 21 as the inaugural Cures4Cats day to emphasize the importance of feline health. This annual day of awareness is dedicated to highlighting Winn-funded research, the critical need for evidence-based medicine, early-stage biomedical research, and health answers for cats.

“Our mission at the Cat Fanciers’ Association has always been promoting the health and welfare of all cats,” said Mark Hannon, CFA President. “We applaud and support the efforts of the Winn Feline Foundation in their promotion of Cures4Cats Day. Their continued efforts have built a strong foundation for improving and managing cat health.”

Winn Feline Foundation has been on the leading-edge of feline health research since 1968 and Cures4Cats Day encourages cat lovers to support their efforts. As Winn embarks on its next 50 years they aim to deliver even more critical advances in cat health.

 

 

Cat Fanciers Make Funds Available

The Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA) earmarked $8,000 for cats and their owners affected by recent hurricanes.

“Relief efforts will be centralized through our respective regional directors,” Mark Hannon, president of CFA said. “The board voted to immediately allocate $4,000 to the CFA geographic regions that include the states of Florida, Louisiana and Texas. An additional $2,000 will be distributed to the CFA’s Breeder Assistance.” The Breeder Assistance Program was created for breeders seeking help in situations out of their control, including acts of nature that result in temporary loss of homes.

According to Hannon, the remaining $2,000 will be held for future relief as needs are identified.

CFA has a long history of proactively supporting and assisting cat owners and breeders in times of disaster.

Contact your regional director, the Breed Assistance Program or the CFA Central Office by visiting http://www.cfa.org for more information.

Refresher Course: Disaster Checklist and Tips for Your Pets

(Editor’s note: As we are in the midst of hurricane season, we thought it important to review the disaster checklist and tips. To read the full article, click here. Also, check out our latest issue of Cat Talk Magazine. Subscription details are here.)

prepared cat

In the event of a natural or man-made disaster, pets are NOT normally allowed inside emergency shelters for humans due to public health and safety reasons. If you and your family need evacuation to a public shelter during a disaster, you must have planned in advance for the care of your dog and cat. Check to see which shelters in your area will allow you to bring your pets. Such planning could save your pets’ life and make yours easier. The alternative, which may not always be wise, is to stay in your home with your pets.

Have a carrier available for each cat, clearly labeled with your name and address.

Water for everyone in your household (enough for at least 7 days to use for drinking, cooking, pets and personal hygiene).

Pet food. Canned food should preferably be in pop-top cans. Dry food should be stored in waterproof containers.

Water bowls and dishes or paper plates for food.

Litter. Have a sufficient supply on hand, and a litter scoop plus garbage bags.

Medication, if necessary, in a sufficient quantity for a minimum of 7 days.

Make sure all pets are either microchipped or have collars with ID (their name, your phone # and address) on them in case they get loose during the storm. Have a picture of them on hand in case you have to go to shelters or post “missing” ads in your neighborhood. “Missing” posters can even be printed ahead of the disaster, just in case they are needed in the aftermath.

Protect important documents (registration certificates, pedigrees, vaccination certificates, etc.), photos, and keepsakes in watertight containers/bags.

Create a family communications list, and copy it to all members of your family. Include home and work phone numbers, your cell phone numbers, and numbers for a close friend as well as email addresses that can be used for contact before, and after, a disaster.

Let your family members know what your plans are (staying put, evacuating, where to, etc.) in advance of a storm, and contact them asap afterward. It will most likely be easier for you to contact them, than for them to try and contact you. Consider setting up a Yahoo! Groups mailing list for your family members and close friends, so that one message to a list will be distributed widely to all who have a need to know. A single mailing list address is easier to remember than a list of dozens.

 

Happy Labor Day!

On #LaborDay, we celebrate the hardworking people who work. But we thought we would digress and give you a peek at some #cats who also have jobs:
Maltilda, Algonquin Hotel – She is a #Ragdoll and the 10th cat in the history of NYC’s #AlgonquinHotel that greets guests, and poses for photos with fans. Fun fact: In addition to the three Maltidas, 7 male cats – all named Hamlet by the legendary actor #JohnBarrymore – have ruled the roost at the Algonquin.

Stubbs, Mayor of Talkeentna, Alaska. This female feline became mayor of this tiny Alaskan town in the late 1990s. He served for just over 20 years before finally passing in July of 2017.

Spike, Left Bank Books – He’s the part-time night manager at the bookstore in #St.Louis, MO.

How about your cats? Do they have jobs, too? Let us know!

Happy Labor Day reading!

CFA’s Ambassador Cats Program Unveils Children’s Coloring Book “Caring for Your Kitty”

coloring bookThe Cat Fanciers’ Association (#CFA) and its Ambassador Cat Program unveil a new coloring book Caring for Your Kitty. Developed to help children understand the importance of caring for a #pet #kitten or cat, it focuses on the four C’s of #pet care:

  • Commitment – while owning a #cat is a life-long responsibility, it also brings many rewards.
  • Care – teaches responsibility
  • Compassion – in addition to caring and loving a new pet, it also helps teach children compassion for all living creatures.
  • Contact – cats provide unconditional love and attention.

Original artwork is by Austen Redinger. He began drawing at a very young age and turned his passion into his career. Austen began his business Anything Cartoon, which specializes in cartoon illustration and design. He provides clients all around the world with illustrations and cartoons that help businesses grow and improve their marketing efforts.

The coloring book is being distributed at CFA shows by the CFA Ambassador Cats Program and is free of charge to show attendees. Check our show calendar to find a CFA show near you.

For ordering information, visit CFA.

Join Us and Royal Canin: National Take Your Cat to the Vet Day

August 22 has been set aside as a date to remind cat owners everywhere to take their #cats to the Vet. CFA has joined with Royal Canin with this promotion.

According to a release from Royal Canin, did you know that while 92 percent of cat owners agree that their cat’s health is important to them, only 41 percent take their cat to the vet for regular checkups, according to a new survey from Royal Canin, a pet nutrition company? In fact, only one cat is seen by a veterinarian for every five dogs, despite the fact that 10 million more cats are owned in the United States.

“Our goal with this year’s program is to rally cat owners, veterinarians, industry partners and even celebrities together to shine the spotlight on the importance of veterinary care for cats,” explained Kamie Eckert, president of Royal Canin USA. “While the gap in preventive veterinary care between dogs and cats in the U.S. continues to be a concern, the great news is that it can be addressed.”

For more information and tips on stress-free vet visits for cat owners and cats or to learn more about Royal Canin visit www.royalcanin.com/Cat2VetDay. You can also join the conversation on social media by using hashtag #Cat2VetDay.

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Those “Kinky” Cats!

Editor’s note:  With all the emphasis being placed on felines with curly coats, we thought we’d share this article:

Those Kinky Cats
by Tracy Petty

Mutations can cause all sorts of changes in cats, just like in other animals. When someone with some knowledge of genetics spots a mutation that they think is interesting, they might develop it, test that it is not harmful, and eventually, that mutation may become the basis for a new breed.

That’s what happened to create six varieties of “kinky cats.” Each of these breeds were developed from separate gene mutations which affected the coat of the offspring. None of these breeds have any known relation to one another; they are all separate mutations occurring at different times and places, but each was carefully bred to make these wonderful and interesting breeds.

Cornish Rex

First found in 1950 in Cornwall, England, the Cornish Rex coat is short, soft, and wavy. While most cats have three layers to their coat, Cornish Rex have only the very shortest “down” layer. For most cats, this layer is hidden amongst the longer layers of hair as an insulating layer. Without guard hairs, the Cornish Rex coat is extremely soft and warm to the touch. The curly coat should lay down in waves, resembling the old-time Marcel wave hairstyles. Cornish Rex are very athletic cats, with long legs and sleek, muscular bodies. They are very active and extremely friendly, and can jump quite high — especially for toys!

Devon Rexdevon rex

Also discovered in England less than a decade later, the Devon Rex mutation was originally thought to be the same as the Cornish Rex, but test breedings quickly proved that this was a different mutation entirely. The Devon Rex coat is also soft and curly, but includes the “awn”, or second layer of coat. The awn hair is only slightly longer than the down hair, but often does not lay in waves close to thebody. Rather, it can form loose Marcel waves or be more free-form waves all over the cat. The head of the Devon Rex has a pixie-like appearance with high cheek bones and very large, wide-set ears. They are extremely loving, people-oriented cats and like the Cornish Rex, their short coats mean minimal shedding and very little coat maintenance.

American Wirehairwirehair

First discovered in the mid-1960s, the American Wirehair is very unique and distinct from any of the Rex breeds. Unlike the Cornish and Devon Rex, the American Wirehair’s curl is in the guard hairs, the longest, outer layer of coat. This is the layer that is meant to protect cats from the elements more than insulate, so it has a harder feel, and thus a completely different texture to the curl. As the name Wirehair implies, this is a coarser, tightly curled coat and it does not lay down in waves, but forms a plush layer of hair around the entire cat. Following a body style similar to the American Shorthair, they don’t have the other-worldly look of the Cornish and Devon Rex, and have a quieter, more reserved demeanor, while still being very affectionate and playful.

Selkirk RexSelkirk Rex

Another American mutation first found in 1987 in Montana is the Selkirk Rex. Like the American Wirehair, the Selkirk curl is in the outer guard hairs, but the coat is soft rather than wired. The curls tend to be large and loosely organized, sometimes gathering in “ringlets” in both the long haired and short haired variety of Selkirk. Several heavy-boned breeds were used to develop the Selkirk Rex breed, so this is a broad, substantial cat with a round head and large, expressive eyes. It is a gentle, patient, and loving breed which requires minimal grooming, as excessive brushing or bathing may relax the curl.

LaPermLaPerm

While a completely separate mutation from other other curly breeds, the LaPerm has taken bits and pieces from the others and formed a unique look and feel. The first LaPerms were found in Oregon in the early ’80s, but were not developed into a breed for nearly a decade after that. Like the Selkirk Rex, LaPerms can be either long haired or short haired, and have a coat texture that is not as soft as the Rex breeds but not as coarse as a Wirehair. It has a more rippled texture, sometimes laying in waves, or ringlets, or even corkscrew curls. They have a moderate body style and medium boning, and unlike the other curly breeds, the LaPerm has long flexible whiskers that don’t break off. These are gentle, affectionate cats that are quick to purr and are always ready to be the perfect lap cat whenever a lap should appear.

Sphynxsphinx

While not technically a kinky-coated cat, the Sphynx is certainly the most risqué breed, daring to go bare! The Sphynx mutation causes hairlessness, or near hairlessness, as most will have a bit of very short hair on the face, ears, feet or tail, and may have a very short, fine “peach fuzz” over the body. Their skin is wrinkled, especially on the legs, head and neck area, and while the body may appear smooth, they can suddenly move and send wrinkles cascading down the body. Sphynx have a full midsection as if they’ve perpetually just finished a good meal, and they love to be the center of attention and will do what they have to do to get and hold your attention. Although they require a bit of upkeep and cleaning to remove body oils that would usually be absorbed by a coat, shedding and dander are minimal and so Sphynx are sometimes tolerated by people who are otherwise sensitive to cats.

New York to Outlaw Declawing?

As we celebrate National Pet Month, I came across this article about NY State and the declawing of Cats

The article from the Associated Press in Albany, says a bill has been introduced to outlaw the declawing of cats in New York. If passed, NY would be the first state in the nation to outlaw the declawing of cats.

Interesting to note that declawing is banned in the United Kingdom and several other European Countries and in several California cities, including San Francisco and Los Angeles.

CFA issued a revised guidance statement in June 2003 pertaining to declawing.

We will keep you updated, but let us know what you think of the proposed legislation in New York.

Celebrating Pets Isn’t Limited to the Month of May

This month marks the start of National Pet Month. But as cat owner, we celebrate our pets all year long. For many of us, the road to our heart is paved with paw prints.

CFA recently posed the question on Facebook: How old were you when you got your first cat?

Alice shared that her parents presented her with her first cat before the age of 2. She’s had many more since then, telling us each one was cherished throughout the years.

Shannon posted that when her mom brought her home from the hospital, her father brought home a litter of kittens he found while on patrol.

Annie related that she asked for her first kitten when she was just a three-year-old. She recalls that she asked for a kitten after watching Pinocchio. She adopted a gold eyed white DSH with a grey patched head…and of course named him Figaro. Annie says he was her best friend.

Betsy tells us that she has a picture of herself at five years holding a kitten. She says at the young age of 79 she continues to care for cats.

Lana’s short-hair, pure white Snowball girl lived to be 18.

So as we celebrate National Pet Month, it is certainly clear that sometimes the smallest things take up the most room in our hearts.Friendship week3