Easter Hazards

Photo: bob in swamp / Foter.com / CC BY

Photo: bob in swamp / Foter.com / CC BY

It’s that time again when Spring is upon us and we look forward with great anticipation to the upcoming Easter holiday and nice, long days of summer ahead.   With 10 to 12 million lily plants produced annually, the lily is a very popular plant to receive as a gift, especially during this time of year.

Cat owners must be aware when bringing lilies into their homes. The following species are known toxins to cats: The Easter lily, Tiger lily, Day Lily, Rubrum lily, Japanese Show Lily, as well as other members of the Liliaceae family can all cause kidney failure in cats. In most plants, the leaves are known toxins along with the stems and flowers in certain species. With some species, cats can eat as little as two or three leaves which can result in liver failure and, if left untreated, can cause death if not caught in time.

Photo: flores do meu jardim / Foter.com / CC BY-NC-SA

Photo: flores do meu jardim / Foter.com / CC BY-NC-SA

If you catch your cat eating a lily plant, contact your veterinarian immediately. Should your cat ingest lily plant material, he may vomit, have diarrhea, became dehydrated and lethargic and develop a lack of appetite. As internal damage progresses, symptoms can become more intense without prompt, appropriate treatment by your veterinarian. Take the plant along when you take your cat to the veterinarian to make it easier for your veterinarian to prescribe the proper care and treatment.

If you receive a lily plant, take extra caution to make sure that the plant is out of reach and kept away from your cat, especially if he likes to nibble on things. Rather than struggle with the problem of where to put the plant, you may decide that cats are more fun and more decorative than a plant and just ban them from your home.

Help Your Cat Avoid These Hazards at Easter

Flowers are lovely and chocolates and candy taste so good!  Be sure to have your cat avoid popular Easter Lillies as they can cause renal failure in cats. Also, you will want to avoid having your cat eat any chocolate bunnies or other Easter candy this year so that you and your cat can enjoy the day without a trip to the vet.

easter lily

If kitty does get into something he should not have, please contact your vet immediately as time is of the essence.  You can also contact the Animal Control Poison Center at 1-888-426-4435.  Charges may apply, but it is well worth it for the safety and health of your cat.

Beware of the Easter Lily with Your Cat

Cat Parents Beware!

It is hard to believe that something so beautiful can be harmful to your cat.  But, this plant can be very toxic for your cat.

Photo: Photoholic1. Foter.com. CC-BY-NC-ND

The entire plant is a hazard: stem, leaves, pollen and petals.  If left untreated, your cat can have kidney failure and can even die as a result.

Early signs (approximately 2-4 hours after ingestion) of lily toxicity
in your cat include:

  • Vomiting
  • Lethargy
  • Lack of appetite

Time is of the essence when treating ingestion. Seek emergency veterinary care immediately. If treated early, within 6-8 hours, your cat has a better chance of survival as opposed to 18-24 hours later.

This Easter, perhaps you may want to start a new tradition of Easter Violets or an Easter Cactus!