Meet the Cornish Rex

Cornish RexIn appearance, Cornish Rex cats are a study in curves starting most noticeably with their coat which ideally falls in washboard waves. The coat is very short, lies close to the body and is incredibly soft to the touch, prompting comparisons to cut velvet, karakul lamb, rabbit fur or silk. In fact, it feels like a Cornish Rex coat and nothing else is the same.

Their bodies resemble Greyhounds, with a naturally arched back, large thigh muscles which gives them the opportunity to launch themselves at a moments notice. Their heads are smallish and egg shaped. They possess huge, luminous eyes. No cat has ears like the Cornish Rex and the bigger the better, as long as they are set high on the head.

Cornish RexIn personality, the Cornish Rex is extremely affectionate and people-oriented. They are also active cats whose kitten-like antics last for their lifetime and who can be very inventive in their play. Favorite Cornish Rex games are fetch, catch and even “discus”, in which the cat uses its hand-like paw to pick up and toss a small object. In spite of their sophisticated, elegant appearance, Cornish Rex cats are anything but cool, aloof or dignified. They are perfect pets for the owner who wants active cats to participate in family life.

Learn more about the Cornish Rex…

 

CFA Hosts World Cat Congress Show

Cats will rule in Vegas, April 22-23!

wcc_logo_globeOver 200 pedigreed cats and kittens to see, as well as everyday household pet cats. You can sit and watch cats on the judging table, or walk around and visit with the cats between judgings.

There will be six judging rings going on concurrently throughout the day, each day. No matter what time you arrive you’re bound to see your favorite breed being judged.

There will be booths with cat toys, cat supplies and unique cat-related apparel and gift items for sale.

Tickets will be available at the door.
Admission:
Adults $5
Children 4 – 17 $2
Children under 4 FREE when accompanied by a paid adult admission.
Click here for $1 off coupon

More details can be found here…

Meet the Bombay

BombayThe Bombay originated in the mid-1960s as a hybrid between the Burmese and the American Shorthair.

With its jet black, gleaming coat, gold to copper eyes, solid body and sweet facial expression, the ideal Bombay has an unmistakable look of its own. The Bombay is a medium-size cat, well-balanced, friendly, alert, and outgoing; muscular and having a surprising weight for its size.

BombayBombays are wonderful companions and will sit on your lap hour after hour; they love to be around people. They will follow you wherever you go changing rooms whenever you move. They want to be the center of attention and in the middle of everything.  They are highly intelligent cats that love to play and are easy to train.

The Bombay is one of the easiest breeds to groom and bathe. Since their coats are so short and satiny there is very little shedding. If given a monthly bath, their shedding is almost nonexistent.

Learn more about the Bombay…

Meet the American Curl

Shorthair American Curl

Shorthair American Curl

The distinctive feature of the American Curl is their attractive, uniquely curled-back ears.

The original American Curl, a longhaired female named Shulamith, was first noted in Southern California in 1981. Selective breeding began in 1983. Curls are elegant, well balanced, moderately muscled, slender rather than massive in build.
When Curls are born, their ears are straight. In three to five days they start to curl back staying in a tight rosebud position, unfurling gradually until permanently set at around sixteen weeks. Although the distinctive feature of the American Curl is their uniquely curled ears, the medium-sized rectangular body, silky flat-lying coat, and expressive walnut-shaped eyes are equally indicative of the breed.

Longhair American Curl

Longhair American Curl

Due to their diverse domestic ancestry, Curls are available in both coat lengths, and can be any color or coat pattern, including the rare colorpoint.
American Curls are very people-oriented, faithful, affectionate soulmates adjusting remarkably fast to other pets, children, and new situations. People say they are very dog-like in their attentiveness to their owners, following them around so not to miss anything.

When introduced into a new home, Curl’s seem to have an inherent respect for the current pet occupants, giving them plenty of room to adjust to the new kid on the block. Not overly talkative, the Curl’s curiosity and intelligence is expressed through little trill-like cooing sounds. Because they retain their kitten-like personality well throughout adulthood, they are referred to as the Peter Pan of felines.

Learn more about the American Curl…

Meet the American Bobtail

Shorthair American Bobtail

Shorthair American Bobtail

The American Bobtail is a medium to large, naturally occurring, bobtailed cat. It is a noticeably athletic animal, well muscled, with the look and feel of power. It possesses a unique natural hunting gaze that combines with the breed’s body type and natural bobtail to give the American Bobtail a distinctive wild appearance. The breeds expression is one of intelligence and alertness.

In this breed no two tails are exactly the same. The average length of the tail is one to four inches, however this is an average, and some tails may be shorter or longer.

The American Bobtail possesses a strong, broad modified wedge-shaped head, with a distinctive brow above large almost almond shaped eyes giving it a natural hunting gaze. The expression is one of intelligence and alertness. Ear furnishings and Lynx ear tipping are highly desirable features in this breed. Its unique coat comes in a shorthair variety with medium semi-dense hair and in a longhair variety with semi-longhair that is shaggy. The coat is resilient and resistant to water. The topcoat is hard with a downy undercoat that insulates the cat from extreme weather.

Longhair American Bobtail

Longhair American Bobtail

This is a slow maturing breed taking two to three years to reach full adult type.

American Bobtails are a loving, kind and incredibly intelligent cat. They are noted for their dog like personalities and their devotion to their owners. They easily adapt to a busy or quiet environment. American Bobtails bond with their family. They get along well with most dogs and have a welcome spot in their hearts for newcomers, whether they are two- or four-legged.

 

Top Five Tips for Working with a Breeder

So, good for you! You have decided you want a pedigreed cat?

Research the behaviors and characteristics of pedigreed cat breeds so you can see what breeds fit in with your family, your lifestyle and personalities.  There has to be a match on all levels.

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Photo: Larry Johnson

Attending a CFA cat show in your area is the best way to observe the different breeds and to talk to breeders about their cats.

Remember, do not be offended if the breeder wants more information from you about your search, what you are looking for a male or female kitten or retired adult.  The breeder may also want to know information about your household, your lifestyle, veterinary and pet sitter information and how many animals you have currently.  They are placing one of their babies into your home and just want to make sure their cats are going to be taken care of.

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Photo credit: <a href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/28652129@N06/”>Anne Worner</a> via <a href=”http://foter.com/”>Foter.com</a> / <a href=”http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/”>CC BY-SA</a>

Below are some good questions/discussions with the breeder:

  1. Cost-depends upon the breed and is determined by the value the breeder places on the pedigree.  The cost  is really a contract between the two of you and is no one else’s business.
  2. Quality-Top show, show quality, breeder quality, pet quality.  If you are interested in showing the cat, be sure that the breeder knows you are interested.
  3. Spay/neuter requirement-is the expectation that the kitten will come to you without being neutered or spayed? Be sure you understand what this requirement is so you can include in any costs/budgeting.
  4. Vet visits for shots and health check
  5. Age for release-  Most breeders release their kittens anywhere from 12-16 weeks of age.

If you have never purchased a pedigreed cat, you will want to understand the protocols ahead of time to make your journey a lot less stressful and a process you will treasure and remember for years to come!