April is Pet First Aid Month

TOP TIPS TO HELP YOUR PET IN AN EMERGENCY

Accidents happen – sometimes pets get injured, eat the wrong foods, get bitten, cut, or even have seizures.  But, there are ways you can help on the way to the vet. As Dr. Doug Aspros, Former President of the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) says, “You can’t be over-prepared. Do your thinking and planning when you’re calm – you’ll make better decisions when the emergency happens.”

7-1 purr-miau_ Photo credit k.h y o  Foter.com  CC BY-NCl

So here are a few life-saving tips from the AVMA to help stabilize your pet:

  • If you think your pet has a broken bone, gently lay him or her on a flat surface, or use a blanket as a sling to gently transport your pet on the way to the veterinarian.
  • With cuts, press a clean, thick gauze pad over the wound and press on it until the bleeding stops. If bleeding is severe and on the legs, apply a tourniquet (using a rubber band and gauze) between the wound and the body to slow down the blood flow and get your animal to the vet ASAP.
  • For burns, flush immediately with lots of water. If the burn is more severe quickly apply an ice compress.
  • If your pet has been exposed to a toxin, check the label for immediate instructions such as washing its skin with soap and water, or flushing eyes with water.
  • If your pet is having seizures, keep them away from any objects, blanket your pet to keep them warm and call your vet or an emergency vet clinic.
  • For choking, if your pet can still breathe, get them to the vet immediately. Look in their mouth with a flashlight and quickly try to get the object out with a tweezer. If that doesn’t work, place both hands on the side of his or her ribcage and strike the rib cage firmly with the palm of your hand 3 to 4 times while getting to the vet.

What your Pet First Aid Kit should include for home or travel:

  • VetWrap (or a similar bandaging product that clings to itself and molds nicely)
  • A nylon leash, muzzle, pet carrier (depending on animal size) and a pillow case for a cat that might need to be restrained; a small flashlight can also be quite useful

For more life-saving tips from the American Veterinarian Medical Association, log onto www.avma.org/

Penn’s Vet Ryan Hospital Offers Free Lecture Series on Animals

The Animal Lovers Lecture Series at  the University of Pennsylvania Vet’s Ryan Hospital in Philadelphia, PA offers free lectures to the public on canine and feline topics the second Saturday of the month.

During the Animal Lovers Lecture Series,faculty and clinicians at the Ryan Veterinary Hospital share current information on topics of interest and relevance to dog and cat owners throughout the region. The series will be on hiatus in July and August, but will resume in September.

Photo credit: @Doug88888 / Foter.com / CC BY-NC-SA

This month’s lecture is by Alexander Reiter, associate professor and chief of dentistry and oral surgery at Penn Vet, will present a special lecture, Commonly Encountered Dental and Oral Diseases in Cats and Dogs. 

Founded in 1884, the school was built on the concept of Many Species, One MedicineTM. The birthplace of veterinary specialties, the school serves a distinctly diverse array of animal patients at its two campuses, from companion animals to horses to farm animals. Penn Vet is one of the world’s premier veterinary schools and is the only school in Pennsylvania graduating veterinarians.

Due to limited seating, reservations are recommended and can be made at (215) 746-7460 or johnrc@vet.upenn.edu.

 

National Non-Profit Group Assists Owners and Pets with Pet Food Stamp Program

There are over 50 million Americans who currently receive Food Stamps. Many of the recipients with dogs or cats cannot afford to feed their animals. As a result, their cherished companions are dropped off at animal shelters where they will most likely be put to sleep.

As more families struggle with difficult choices such as paying the rent or buying food; some have to make the difficult choice between keeping their pet and putting food on the table for themselves.

A recent New York Times article states that, “animal shelters have reported a steep rise in the number of cats and dogs being surrendered as owners face unemployment, home foreclosures, evictions and other financial hardships.”

The Pet Food Stamps program with the assistance of generous contributors and patrons are able to eliminate that heart-wrenching decision by making sure these pet owners are given free monthly home delivery of all necessary food supplies to maintain the health and vitality of their pets.

To find out more about the Pet Food Stamps program or make a donation to help those in need.