Meet the Abyssinian

RuddyAbyAlthough the Abyssinian is one of the oldest known breeds, there continues to be speculation and controversy concerning its history. In appearance, Abyssinians resemble the paintings and sculptures of ancient Egyptian cats, which portray an elegant feline with a muscular body, beautiful arched neck, large ears and almond shaped eyes. Abys today still retain the jungle look of felis lybica, the African wildcat ancestor of all domestic cats.

The breed is permitted four coat colors by CFA: Ruddy, Red, Blue and Fawn. The shape of the head forms a modified wedge with eyes curved like almonds. The Abyssinian has large, slightly pointed ears. The head, eyes and ears all fit together in a complimentary fashion favoring neither extreme length nor extreme shortness.

RedAbyThe personality of the Abyssinian is best described by one word: busy. These are incredibly intelligent cats, good problem solvers with an insatiable curiosity. Add to this their natural athleticism, which comes with their muscular bodies , and you have a potent combination. Abyssinians want to do everything on their own terms. Unless you understand their unique personality these fascinating cats can be a great challenge when living with one as a pet. They are incredibly playful even into adulthood. Everything they do seems larger than life. When they play, they seem to have no concern for life or limb and commit all of their energy and concentration.

BlueAbyFor the most part, these are low maintenance cats although they do enjoy being rubbed affectionately and require a bath at least once during the shedding season. Washing them with a good cat shampoo, quick towelling, and drip-drying is all that is needed. Bathing should be started when they are young and so should clipping their claws regularly and before each bath.

FawnAbyFor those who want a portion of the wild kingdom, who want an active, independent, loving cat, this very ancient breed may be just right. These mischievous, highly animated shorthaired cats, with their iridescent, colorful coats, can provide years of pleasure for any household. It is not a mystery to see why those who have had an Aby, usually have no other breed as a pet. It has become one of the most popular cat breeds of modern time.

 

Tips For Keeping your Cat Safe During a Disaster

Whether you live in an area prone to hurricanes, earthquakes, fires, tornadoes or floods, you can’t wait until Mother Nature comes knocking at your door…   The time to be prepared is now, and advance planning could save your pets’ life and make yours easier.

  • June1Take several pictures of all the animals in your household and keep these pictures with your important insurance papers (include vaccination records, too). Be sure to include in the pictures any distinguishing marks. These pictures can help reunite you with a lost pet. Store the pictures in a resealable plastic bag in case you have to post them during rainy months.
  • Have at least a minimum two week supply of pet food and water on hand at all times. Store the dry food in air tight/waterproof containers. If you use canned food, buy the flip top cans or have a can opener in your airtight disaster supply container. Keep some of your pet’s favorite treats on hand – they get stressed, too, and a treat provides them some comfort. Also keep a supply of cat litter, a clean litter scoop, and litter pan in your disaster kit.
  • Put a collar and tag (with address and phone number) on your pets. This will increase your chances of reuniting you with your pets if they escape.
  • If your dog rides in the car, always have a leash in the vehicle to be able to keep your dog safely controlled if you have to leave your car. A disaster may occur while you are away from home.
  • Always keep a back-up supply of your pets’ medications. A vet may not be open for some time following a disaster. Prepare to ice down medications that need to be refrigerated (ice is available from the Red Cross). Ask your vet is he/she has a disaster plan. Your pets may need medical attention after a disaster and you need to know where to take your animal. Keep a first aid kit in your disaster kit for your pet (check with your vet on what to include).
  • Have a cat carrier or evacsack to evacuate each cat in your household. If you have to confine the cat(s) for a long period of time, have a carrier large enough to hold a shoe box sized litter box, a water/food dish, and room for the cat to comfortably lie down. Ensure the carrier is not left in the sun, and, if it is warm, that the cat gets good ventilation. If you must take the cat out, do so in a confined space as the cat may try to run away.
  • Start a buddy system with someone in your neighborhood so that they will check on your animals during disaster in case you aren’t home. Agree to do the same for them. Exchange information on veterinarians and have a permission slip put in your file at the vets, authorizing your buddy to get necessary emergency treatment for your pet in case you can’t be reached. Talk with your pets’ “babysitter” about a disaster plan to be used to evacuate and care for your animals in your absence.
  • Comfort your pet during a disaster – they are frightened, too. Having you near to give them a hug will help. Do not force this – let them come to you when they are ready.
  • Continue to feed your pets the food they are used to and put it out as close to the normal time as possible. If you feed canned food, reduce the normal amount by half (supplement with dry food) to reduce the possibility of diarrhea. Be sure to provide your pets with fresh water at all times.
  • Know where the animal shelters are in your area. You may need to visit them after a disaster to look for a missing pet. Also call the National Lost Pet Hotline, 1-900-535-1515 (this is a charge call) to report a lost pet. Call the National Found Pet Hotline, 1-800-755-8111 to report a found animal.
  • Check with local news media for facilities offering disaster animal rescue and relief. Also, you may call (800) 979-0241 and leave your phone number for assistance.
  • Microchip Your Pet!

PLANNING AHEAD COULD SAVE YOUR PETS’ LIFE!

 

Things to Consider Before Bringing a Kitten Home

Sunday, March 20 was the first official day of Spring 2016 and a perfect time to bring a new kitten home.  Here are five things to consider when you are considering a kitten for your forever home.

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  1. Make sure that your kitten is at least three months of age. By then, mom has socialized and weaned the kitten so that it can survive.
  2. A healthy kitten has a muscular body, firm to the touch, clear eyes and will move with confidence and strength.
  3. Whether buying from a breeder or whether you get your cat from your local rescue, be sure to find out all you can about the kitten. For a pedigreed cat, talk with your breeder so that you can understand the temperament and pedigree behind the kitten.  For a rescue kitten, be sure to get as much information about the conditions which the kitten was found.
  4. Choose your vet in advance and talk to her about how to keep your kitten happy and healthy. Your vet is the best expert to guide you about proper nutrition and care.
  5. Have fun bonding with your new kitten that will build over time and so that you can become pals for years to come.
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PALS—People and Animals Living Safely

Urban Resource Institute (URI) is launching New York City’s first-ever co-sheltering program to allow domestic violence survivors and their pets to reside together in a shelter. The project, called PALS—People and Animals Living Safely—will run as a 6-month pilot which began on June 1.

The URI is partnering with the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals because of its expertise in ensuring pet safety in crisis situations.


purr-miau_ Photo credit k.h y o Foter.com CC BY-NCl

Currently, as many as 40% of domestic violence victims delay leaving abusive situations out of concern for their pets’ safety, yet no domestic violence shelters in New York City—and only few nationwide—allow pets in residence.

URI PALS is addressing this need by equipping its largest emergency domestic violence shelter to house families and small animals together, preserving the welfare and safety of all.

Great idea! Kudos to all!